Commodore Amiga Emulator coming to iPhone

Niemann on Wednesday, 10 February 2010. Posted in News


TouchArcade reports "Retro gaming fans can add another item to their "things in life to be excited for" list, as we just got word that Manomio, who brought us the C64 for iPhone [App Store] emulator, is currently working on bringing an Amiga emulator to the App Store."

C64, the Commodore 64 emulator referenced, had troubles with the AppStore approval process when it was discovered that the user was able to execute arbitrary BASIC code through the emulator.  The Commodore Amiga granted users even more freedom and it will be interesting to see the delivery system and application package that Manomio submit to the AppStore.

Virtual ][ Updated

iBatman on Tuesday, 09 February 2010. Posted in News


Slow batch of news in 2010 it seems.    Well folks, here's an update to the Apple ][ Emulator.   Here's a list of features to those new to this application or this site.  

  • Emulates the Apple ][, ][+ and //e
  • Supports USB game pad and joystick
  • Store a running machine and resume later on
  • Full-screen mode
  • Epson FX-80 and Imagewriter II emulation
  • Many configurable peripheral cards
  • Realistic sound effects, including Mockingboard emulation
  • Convert original Apple II diskettes
  • Index your Apple II disk images
  • Debug Apple II programs

Not a lot of changes to this release but here's the list.

Version 6.3.6:

  • The program now accepts "dsk" image files with 41 tracks (the maximum so far was 40).
  • A recent Snow Leopard upgrade broke the "Make Movie from Apple II Screen" feature. This has been fixed.
  • Cassette tape files now get file name extension "cass" instead of "aif". As a result, the cassette tape icon appears correctly again in Snow Leopard. Old "aif" files can still be read

Visit Homepage      Download now

The Current State of Mac Gaming: Commercial Reality of Today

mossy_11 on Sunday, 07 February 2010. Posted in Opinion

Last time, I wrote about history of gaming on the Mac.  We took a look at how it came to be in such a sorry state by the time Apple announced the move from PowerPC to Intel architecture.  We left off with the reaction to the Intel switch from developers, commentators and users. Some predicted the transition would be the final death-knell of Mac games, since there was no longer a barrier to playing Windows games on the Mac. Others suggested it would kill the porting industry, but only harm rather than destroy business for the few surviving developers of original Mac games. The more optimistic types thought it might be a boon for Mac gaming, as both porting and multi-platform development would be significantly easier now that Macs were built from the same parts as their PC brethren.


Glider PRO

mossy_11 on Sunday, 31 January 2010. Posted in Mac Classics Reborn

The quintessential paper plane simulator, John Calhoun's shareware classic Glider first emerged in 1988 "for all Macs". Its basic premise involved the player guiding a paper plane through 15 rooms, while avoiding obstacles (including a cat) and keeping the "glider" airborne, with the help of upward air movement from vents. Subsequent versions added new rooms, features, and obstacles, but the gameplay remained essentially the same.

Glider's simple mechanics and undeniable charm spawned a dedicated fan community, consisting mostly of modders, who created new levels or "houses" for the game. There was even a fanzine for a few years in the mid-90s.

Glider PRO, the fifth major version of Glider, was released in 1994 for Macs running System 7 or better. It was repeatedly updated to run on newer hardware, and even got a commercial release on CD, before publisher Casady & Greene went out of business in 2003. John Calhoun released all versions of Glider as freeware soon after.


The Current State of Mac Gaming: How It Got This Way

mossy_11 on Monday, 25 January 2010. Posted in Opinion

The Mac isn't exactly known for its ability to play games. And given the repeated snubbing from big publishers and developers in recent years, this isn't without reason. But it hasn't always been a wasteland for games, sparsely populated by a handful of the PC's sloppy seconds. In this series of articles I will discuss the highs and lows of Mac gaming.  We start with some history, then we will look in-depth at the current situation, and finally we will take a look to the future.


Final Fantasy Coming to the iPhone

Niemann on Friday, 22 January 2010. Posted in News

Seems like there's just a ton of iPhone news for us over the past couple days; and now we have news that Square Enix is bringing one of the most successful RPG series of all time to the iPhone and iPod Touch.  In December of 1987 the original Final Fantasy was released for the Nintendo Entertainment System.  Since then Final Fantasy has released twelve sequels (most recently Final Fantasy XIII for Playstation 3 and Xbox 360) and countless spin-offs.


On Wednesday, Square Enix posted a series of screenshots to their facebook page under the title "FINAL FANTASY and FINAL FANTASY II for iPhone / iPod touch".  The only other information included is:

"Over 20 years since the original releases, FINAL FANTASY and FINAL FANTASY II are coming to iPhone / iPod touch!  Release date: TBA.  Stay tuned!"

The interface appears to be slightly modified from the original GUI elements we have seen in previous remakes of the game.  This implies that Square Enix is taking advantage of the touch screen to navigate menus as opposed to other ports and remakes which have centered around an overlay gamepad.

View more of the screenshots after the break.

Will the tablet succeed?

Niemann on Friday, 22 January 2010. Posted in Opinion

Next week we will be introduced to a new product from Apple.  This product will be the long rumored tablet-device which Steve Jobs has been intimately involved with for the past couple of years.  I don't care what the device is called (my money is with iPad at this point), what I do care about it is what the device can do for me.  I'm a gamer; so why should I care?


Sega Announces Ultimate Genesis iPhone Emulator

Niemann on Wednesday, 20 January 2010. Posted in News

Sega, creator of the original Sega Genesis console system, has just announced Sega's Ultimate Genesis app for the iPhone and iPod Touch.  Fundamentally, this free app allows the purchase of many classic Sega games such as Sonic the Hedgehog ($5.99) and Golden Axe ($4.99).  This app appears to be a fully featured emulator which downloads authentic ROMs of the original games; this means you receive the most authentic experience possible.

What is unique about this product is that it is an emulator and appears to be in direct conflict with Apple's AppStore policies.  Current Sega Genesis emulators for the iPhone are available only on jailbroken iPhones (genesis4iphone video above; ignore terrible music).  Others have successfully released similar products for the iPhone including C64, which is a Virtual Console-esque app for the Commodore 64.

The app is free and includes one free game; Space Harrier II.  Anyone else want to see Road Rash or General Chaos on the iPhone (or iPad) as much as we do?